Nicky's little tumble thing

nunnarynip-the-snippyvixen:

psycho-manties:

jumpingjacktrash:

monthofmay:

Redditor’s wife knitted a beautiful star chart shawl.

this is the pattern i just reblogged the ravelry link to, except they apparently left out the yarnover eyelets, and i think i like it better.

I NEED ITTTTTTT

I want this so much

cisandhetphobia:

*points to favorite character* bisexual

*fandom crying loudly* no…stop……theyre not….they either homogay or heterostraight…..please don’t….

*points to favorite character again* love that bisexual

i dont even sleep anymore i just die for a couple hours each day

missnk:

I started watching JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure lately so I decided I’d draw a tough street thug, aka Speedwagon.
I am very into the JoJos.

missnk:

I started watching JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure lately so I decided I’d draw a tough street thug, aka Speedwagon.

I am very into the JoJos.

freckledmarcoo:

Pro tip: start watching Free! as a joke then notice how your life turns into an emotional wreck after that 

How to have a zero drama fandom
Step 1: like a thing
Step 2: find a few close friends who also like the thing
Step 3: don't talk to anyone else in the fandom literally those 5-6 persons are your fandom
Happiness in stories at most is a couple lines at the end. It’s boring.

- Drosselmeyer

I actually love this quote because it represents a cynical philosophy on storytelling (and life) that his own characters prove wrong.

Princess Tutu’s many layers of meta, and the story’s commentary on stories themselves, is my favourite thing about it. Drosselmeyer’s characters, and by extension, the narrative itself, show that a happy ending is not simple and uninteresting. It’s a common belief today, that in storytelling, darkness and tragedy equals depth and maturity.

However, all the main characters in Princess Tutu faced harsh realities, struggled with their identities, and made sacrifices. They ultimately defined their own identities, and found hope in a bleak situation. They worked hard for their happiness. And that is profound storytelling. 

Princess Tutu says that hope is something that should be celebrated in storytelling, and life. 

(via glompcat)